A Brief Note on Archaeology and Salmon

It is that time of the year again: another wave of Tables of Contents in my inbox. I subscribe to content alerting for a variety of archaeology journals and I’m always fascinated by the variety within the archaeological community today in terms of their ‘humanism’. Thus the same article published in different journals would be:

Journal of Archaeological Science: Use of Strontium Isotopes Reveals Extreme Salmon Specialization At Prince Rupert Island, British Columbia

Journal of Anthropological Archaeology: Do You Never Get Tired of Samon? Evidence For Extreme Salmon Specialization At Prince Rupert Island, British Columbia

Archaeological Dialogues: Salmon and Agency

Just saying.

Alex Golub is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. His book Leviathans at The Gold Mine has been published by Duke University Press. You can contact him at rex@savageminds.org

3 thoughts on “A Brief Note on Archaeology and Salmon

  1. Its a parlor game. I guess it could also be played with particular scholars rather than journals.

    In the Plains Anthropologist: A Salmon Kill Site on Prince Rupert Island, British Columbia

    In Southeastern Archaeology: Salmon Processing as Pathway to Chiefdom Formation: The View from Prince Rupert Island, British Columbia

    In Current Anthropology: Tool Use, Cognition, and Provisioning: Modeling Salmon Technologies on Prince Rupert Island and in the Pre-capitalist World System

    In Pre-1970 Journal of American Folklore: Salmon Jokes from Prince Rupert Island.

    In Post-1970 Journal of American Folklore: Differential Identity and Negotiated Performance in Everyday Life: The Narrative Construction of Salmon and Salmon Industry Laborers on Prince Rupert Island

    In Journal of Linguistic Anthropology: Language Ideologies and Indexicality

    In Public Culture: Salmonitality

  2. This is fun.

    Social Archaeology: “Finding Nemo: The Spatiality of Salmon Production at Prince Rupert Island”

    Radiocarbon: “Fractionation of vertebrae from Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in Pacific Estuary Settings”

    Cuicuilco (a Mexican anthropology journal) “Salmon and the Asiatic Mode of Production at Prince Rupert Island, Canada”

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