Comments for Savage Minds http://savageminds.org Notes and Queries in Anthropology Fri, 11 Sep 2015 21:16:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 Comment on The Riddle of Sean Lien by [BLOG] Some Friday links | A Bit More Detail http://savageminds.org/2015/09/09/the-riddle-of-sean-lien/comment-page-1/#comment-838338 Fri, 11 Sep 2015 21:16:33 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17744#comment-838338 […] Minds has an anthropological take on turmoil in […]

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Comment on Partha Chatterjee: Why I Support the Boycott of Israeli Institutions by Partha Chatterjee: Why I Support the Boycott of Israeli Institutions | US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel http://savageminds.org/2015/09/09/partha-chatterjee-why-i-support-the-boycott-of-israeli-institutions/comment-page-1/#comment-838331 Fri, 11 Sep 2015 08:15:57 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17745#comment-838331 […] USACBI is honored to republish this essay by Partha Chatterjee, Professor of Anthropology and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University, and of the Centre for the Studies of Social Sciences in Calcutta, and notes his endorsement of the USACBI call as well as the Anthropologists for the Boycott of Israeli Academic Institutions’ petition. He is a founding member of the Subaltern Studies Collective. This post originally appeared on Savage Minds. […]

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Comment on Partha Chatterjee: Why I Support the Boycott of Israeli Institutions by Are you recognizing the signs of colonial superiority, wherever you go? | Adonis Diaries http://savageminds.org/2015/09/09/partha-chatterjee-why-i-support-the-boycott-of-israeli-institutions/comment-page-1/#comment-838328 Fri, 11 Sep 2015 06:19:18 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17745#comment-838328 […] Carole McGranahan posted this September 9, 2015 […]

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Comment on Partha Chatterjee: Why I Support the Boycott of Israeli Institutions by Sukhamaya Bain http://savageminds.org/2015/09/09/partha-chatterjee-why-i-support-the-boycott-of-israeli-institutions/comment-page-1/#comment-838317 Fri, 11 Sep 2015 00:52:00 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17745#comment-838317 Partha Chatterjee’s likening of Kashmir and Tripura with Israel is hardly rational.

The non-Muslims of other parts of India did not consider Kashmir anything like a ‘promised land’ to settle in, the way the Zionists of the world did to Palestine. In fact, there is an Indian law that prevents non-Kashmiris to buy land there. If the Kashmiri religious majority had an opportunity, that land most likely would have been something like a Pakistan or Bangladesh today, with the non-Muslims of that land totally expelled/marginalized. Even with all the Indian military presence there, the Muslim majority there have driven out the minority Hindu Pandits from the Kashmir valley. The Muslims of that land have all the power there, except for making that land an Islamic nation of injustice and atrocity. The Muslims of Kashmir certainly have a lot more sovereignty than what the Arabs have in Israel.

Similarly, Tripura was not considered a ‘promised land’ by the settlers from East Bengal (today’s Bangladesh). The persecuted Hindus of East Bengal went to India, including Tripura, for shelter, not for ruling, not for subjugating the local population. Being more educated, they had an advantage over the local population of Tripura. Being too many in number from the densely populated East Bengal, they also became a majority in the land that had been sparsely populated. But their intent was never like what the Zionists wanted to do to the Palestinians. As Mr. Chatterjee has also observed, the Bengali dominated government has been trying to build bridges between the Tribal and the Bengali populations. There is no policy of settling more Bengalis from other parts of the world in Tripura; quite unlike what is going on in Israel.

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Comment on The social costs of export agriculture in San Quintin, Baja California–An Interview with Christian Zlolniski by COLA Notes for September 2015 | College of Liberal Arts Newsroom http://savageminds.org/2015/08/23/the-social-costs-of-export-agriculture-in-san-quintin-baja-california-an-interview-with-christian-zlolniski/comment-page-1/#comment-838302 Wed, 09 Sep 2015 14:50:45 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17631#comment-838302 […] at noon in the Sixth Floor Parlor in the Central Library. … The anthropology blog, Savage Minds, interviewed Associate Professor Christian Zlolniski (Anthropology) about the social costs of export agriculture […]

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Comment on Anthropologies #21: Annual Review of Anthropology, Climate Change, Anthropocene by Jason Antrosio (@JasonAntrosio) http://savageminds.org/2015/08/31/anthropologies-21-annual-review-of-anthropology-climate-change-anthropocene/comment-page-1/#comment-838296 Tue, 08 Sep 2015 12:45:56 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17680#comment-838296 With thanks to Professor Scupin, the original review by Sean Seary was meant to cover some older articles in the Annual Review of Anthropology. In the follow-up volume of Open Anthropology, Climate Change and Anthropology, the Roscoe article was included and discussed. It was open access for six months, although they are about to close those articles again.

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Comment on Anthropologies #21: Is There Hope for an Anthropocene Anthropology? by Lee Drummond http://savageminds.org/2015/09/05/anthropologies-21-is-there-hope-for-an-anthropocene-anthropology/comment-page-1/#comment-838277 Sun, 06 Sep 2015 05:32:57 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17699#comment-838277 Todd and Elizabeth,
I’m sure we’ll have an opportunity to discuss the “Anthropocene” in more detail as this series of posts unfolds, but for now I am puzzled: Haven’t anthropologists of yore cautioned their young changes in Anthro 101 courses across the land to renounce the twin sins of ethnocentrism and, yes, anthropocentrism? Is it now okay, thanks to the good and authoritative discourse of Latour, to claim that the planet revolves, not around the Sun, but around us? Does accepting the existence of the Anthropocene rehabilitate what was formerly an unfortunate prejudice — anthropocentrism — to the status of new and important wisdom? Label me confused.

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Comment on Anthropologies #21: Is There Hope for an Anthropocene Anthropology? by Fakunle Oluwatoni http://savageminds.org/2015/09/05/anthropologies-21-is-there-hope-for-an-anthropocene-anthropology/comment-page-1/#comment-838274 Sat, 05 Sep 2015 21:01:09 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17699#comment-838274 Check out The Applied Existential Anthropology Project’s World Crises Analysis on our entrance into the sixth mass extinction(http://www.theappliedexistentialanthropologyproject.com/p/the-aea-projs-woe.html)

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Comment on Toward Living with (not Under) Anthropology, Pt. 2 by Takami http://savageminds.org/2015/08/25/toward-living-with-not-under-anthropology-pt-2/comment-page-1/#comment-838261 Thu, 03 Sep 2015 18:23:54 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17572#comment-838261 Thank you Megan for your encouraging words. Your comment certainly helps me believe that there are many wonderful academic anthropologists out there, leading the next generations of anthropologists to a better anthropology. Thanks again!

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Comment on Around the Web Digest: Week of August 23 by Prof West http://savageminds.org/2015/08/31/around-the-web-digest-week-of-august-23/comment-page-1/#comment-838258 Thu, 03 Sep 2015 14:04:48 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17677#comment-838258 Stoller’s defense raised more questions than it answered. Just like a police officer says something does or doesn’t happen, so is there a legitimate question whether all ethnographers follow the “deep and profound commitment to ethics”. Campos clearly thinks driving an armed man around a field site who is looking to kill someone fails his ethical standard. I’m not sure the best defense is really that Campos (or Lubet) are lawyers who just don’t understand how we roll …

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Comment on Ethnographic Field Data 3: Preserving and Sharing Ethnographic Data by johnmccreery http://savageminds.org/2015/08/28/ethnographic-field-data-3-preserving-and-sharing-ethnographic-data/comment-page-1/#comment-838255 Wed, 02 Sep 2015 02:40:08 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17558#comment-838255 A special word of thanks to Celia—and to Savage Minds. Celia and I have had a very fruitful exchange via email, adding details like the possibility of scans that produce 400-600 dpi TIFFs that can be converted to grayscale before heightening contrast in Photoshop. Wouldn’t have happened without Savage Minds.

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Comment on Anthropologies #21: Annual Review of Anthropology, Climate Change, Anthropocene by Raymond Scupin http://savageminds.org/2015/08/31/anthropologies-21-annual-review-of-anthropology-climate-change-anthropocene/comment-page-1/#comment-838254 Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:29:46 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17680#comment-838254 This blog post should have mentioned the recent article “A Changing Climate for Anthropological and Archaeological Research? Improving the Climate-Change Models,” wherein Paul (Jim) Roscoe suggests that anthropologists can go beyond assisting local and national governments regarding climate change (2014). He indicates that archaeological and anthropological research can assist the modeling and predictions made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in providing details on past and current sociocultural evolution and development. The IPCC produces the international reports on climate change. Normally, the IPCC relies on “explorative” scenarios that combine economic, statistical, and quantitative models along with qualitative narratives in order to forecast the future of greenhouse gas emissions (GGEs) and global temperatures. The archaeological and anthropological data has demonstrated that since the end of the Pleistocene about 10,000 years ago, thousands of small egalitarian foraging societies have since consolidated into about 200 politically centralized nations (Roscoe 2014). Although there have been collapses of agricultural civilizations in the past, overall sociocultural evolution has exhibited global technological, economic and political convergence with higher GGEs. In addition, cross-cultural research by anthropologists have demonstrated that patterns of status competition and the conspicuous consumption that has emerged in the highly industrialized and postindustrial societies are responsible for higher rates of GGEs. As Roscoe emphasizes absent a global catastrophe such as an asteroid strike, a thermonuclear war, or abrupt climatic change, these patterns of consumerism with higher rates of GGEs are likely to become widely influential throughout the world.

In order to reduce some of the uncertainties regarding climate change, Roscoe suggests that the integrative, cross- cultural, and transtemporal approaches of anthropological studies need to be incorporated into future IPCC reports. Anthropologists and archaeologists can specify long- term urbanization, population, technological, economic, and evolutionary trends that contribute to higher rates of GGEs. In addition, anthropologists may be able to mitigate some of these trends by promoting alternative models of global sustainability.

References:
Roscoe, Paul. 2014. “A Changing Climate for Anthropological and Archaeological Research? Improving the Climate Change Models.” American Anthropologist 116 (3): 535–548.

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Comment on Anthropologies #21: Annual Review of Anthropology, Climate Change, Anthropocene by Helga Vierich http://savageminds.org/2015/08/31/anthropologies-21-annual-review-of-anthropology-climate-change-anthropocene/comment-page-1/#comment-838253 Tue, 01 Sep 2015 13:58:46 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17680#comment-838253 Besides climate change, we also need to focus on the relentless and accelerating exploitation of natural resources, both hypothetically renewable (like forests and fish) and nonrenewable (like coal and oil). It certainly seems that the pace of climate change will necessitate changes in energy policy, and specifically with an end of our economic involvement with fossil fuels ASAP. This involves anthropologists rather immediately, since many indigenous people’s biggest political fights for survival right now are brought on by conflicts over access to their remaining land base: they are often strong-armed by state military and police forces so that corporations can move in to frack for oil, mine various minerals or coal, or log the forests and turn the land over to commercial plantations. This is happening all over the world.

In other words, an anthropology of global industrialism is needed, to take on the process. I think anthropology (and not just us) got sidetracked by thinking that there was actually a difference between “capitalist” and “communist” systems.. but these are, today, just extremes of a range of ways to politically organize an industrial system. Industrial systems are what we need to be studying and how they relate to the biosphere, how they create these ridiculous political oppositions between “right” and “left”.. and how this actually diverts the attention of many people (including politicians) form the real problems of tackling adaptation to climate change. It may very well turn out that the sustainable solutions to human economic actives on this planet are not compatible with an industrial economic model, with its implicate growth dependent financial structure.

We’ve dealt with all sorts of secret societies and taboos before, maybe we ought to start tackling those within our own culture. Start with the mythology of “progress” and endless growth, take on the taboo subjects on Wall Street and the Koch brothers. Unpack what economic “depression” really means for long term economic sustainability – we have reified the concept fo “employment” to the point where anyone without a job has not value. This has got to interest us, we anthropologists studied human values in thousands of cultures.

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Comment on The social costs of export agriculture in San Quintin, Baja California–An Interview with Christian Zlolniski by johnmccreery http://savageminds.org/2015/08/23/the-social-costs-of-export-agriculture-in-san-quintin-baja-california-an-interview-with-christian-zlolniski/comment-page-1/#comment-838251 Tue, 01 Sep 2015 05:34:01 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17631#comment-838251 Ryan, my pleasure. This issue is one I have been thinking a lot about. A thought that keeps nagging me is that while Boas, Malinowski, E-P, etc., wrote about the other, their topics were live issues for the us — the “us” defined as those seen as contemporaries with similar intellectual interests. Thus, since Malinowski is the case I know best, you didn’t have to be interested in Melanesia to get excited about the Trobrianders. The kula challenged accepted notions of how an economy can be organized, an alternative to both free market and communist orthodoxies. Their matrilineally and household organization challenged the assumptions of psychoanalysis. Their sex lives….well, sex is always interesting.

Consider anthropology today, sliced and diced by topical and areal interests into mostly handfuls, rarely more than a few hundred, individuals who happen to share the same interests. Add what I have called “ethnographic involution,” a narrow focus that excludes comparative analysis, and ethnography restricted to trying to translate what the people who share their lives with us have to say about themselves. Local history is a fine hobby, but local historians don’t expect much interest from people who weren’t born or grew up in the places whose history they study.

One of the great things about this interview is that it doesn’t fall into these traps. It reminds us that our ability to consume fresh fruit and vegetables all year round is the result of industrialized agriculture dependent on cheap labor — which means that the people who provide that labor mostly live in horrible conditions. But is that enough to grab the attention of readers who would rather not think about such issues. Where is the hook that pulls us out of our shells?

I think of the problem the people who create advertising often confront. We work with folks who have invested large amounts of time and large amounts of money in developing new products and services. They are, naturally, fascinated, even obsessed, by what they have achieved. Getting them to step back and ask, *Why should anyone who isn’t you be interested in this?” is often difficult. I see the same problem with my anthropologist friends today.

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Comment on Forget the outrage: Stop signing away your author rights to corporations by Ryan http://savageminds.org/2015/08/22/forget-outrage-stop-signing-away-rights-corporations/comment-page-1/#comment-838250 Tue, 01 Sep 2015 02:57:05 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=17481#comment-838250 Hi Anon, thanks for the comment.

You write: “While big commercial publishers tend to exert powerful control over the distribution of the works they publish, nonprofit university presses are much more flexible (and their subscription rates are totally reasonable).”

Yes, this is a good point and part of the reason for reading up about publishing, OA, etc. Jason Jackson, who I interviewed on Savage Minds a while back, is a big champion of these University Presses.

“Please consider the nuance of the publishing landscape. This is not a black/white, closed/open debate…”

It is a nuanced landscape and yes, it’s not a black and white, simple issue. All the more reason for us to push more conversation about how we publish. I still think this conversation should start happening in grad school, particularly because of all the pressure to publish sooner than later. If we’re going to publish, we should take the time to know a little more about how it all works, why we’re publishing, etc.

Thanks again for your comment.

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