Category Archives: Around the Web

Around the Web Digest: Week of March 23

You guys. There were so many good articles this week. Excellent, excellent articles. I was pretty overwhelmed, to be honest, especially when I was trying to select the one article that I wanted to highlight this week. I can’t put them all up, but I think I’ve picked some of the best (or at least thought-provoking). As always, if you have any links that you want to share, please send them my way at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter @dtpowis.

To the Digest! Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of March 16

Student protests in Taiwan, International Day of Happiness, and the Society for Applied Anthropology meeting in Albuquerque – it’s been a busy week. If you went to SfAA this week, and you have a blog or some sort of coverage that you’d like to share with us, please let me know – as with anything you might want to see in the Digest – by email (richard.powis@gmail.com) or on Twitter @dtpowis. Anyway, as I said last week, there is one article that I’d like to highlight for those that might be short on time. Now, it might just be the goth kid in me that I’ve been trying to suppress since just after high school, but I really enjoyed Miia Halme-Tuomisaari’s critique of happiness (or, at least measures of happiness). Check it out below. Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of March 9

There have been very many language/linguistics-related items this week, so the first several links will be related. Also, this week I’ve decided that I’m going to start drawing your attention to one particular article in the Digest. This is to say, if you read just one article here, I highly recommend “this one.” As always, if you have any blog articles or suggestions, send them my way at richard.powis@gmail.com and be sure to follow me on Twitter @dtpowis. Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of March 2

A couple weeks ago, when I took helm of the HMS Around the Web Digest (yeah, it’s British – it’s my ship and I do what I want), I was naïve enough to think that I would curate collections of themed articles. Alas, there is just so much good stuff that it’s really difficult at the end of the week to select the things that I don’t want to share. I do my best to cut the chaff (yeah, I just went from running a ship to processing wheat), so I apologize if it’s overwhelming. I am open to feedback! Anyway, if you have a blog article that you would like to be shared in the Around the Web Digest, just hit me at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter @dtpowis. So here we go. Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of February 23

In the face of highly productive biological anthropologists, as well as the blog Somatosphere, I think I managed to curate a pretty well-rounded Around the Web Digest for this week. If you have a blog post or article that you would like mentioned next week, shoot it to me at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter. Of course, if this were any other blog, my first link would say, “Hey, go check out Savage Minds’ new design!” but alas, you’re already here. What I bet you didn’t know is: The whole site is back up, archives and all. I mean, look at this gem that I found from 2005! (Gawd, I wasn’t even a twinkle in my advisor’s eye.) Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of February 16

Greetings all! My name is Dick Powis and I’m one of the new interns here at Savage Minds. You may know me from my own blog, Anthropology Attacks!, where I yammer on and few listen. As an intern, I will be taking over the Around the Web Digests from Matt Thompson. I intend to post new Digests weekly, starting today, and as you’ll see, I’m going to be doing it a little differently. If you come across any stories or articles that you think I should mention in next week’s Digest, please email me at richard.powis@gmail.com. I’m also looking forward to connecting with other anthropology bloggers who would like to have their works promoted, so please follow me @dtpowis on Twitter.

So I’d like to start off my first Around the Web Digest with my dilemma. Should I curate a collection of links in honor of Black History Month? On the one hand, I think that featuring a collection of articles related to Black History/Anthropology would be a great gesture on behalf of the kind of diversity that we want to see in anthropology. On the other hand, my opinion of Black History Month is not unlike that voiced by many of my colleagues in the humanities: it is a hollow attempt at equity, the designation of the shortest month of the year in honor of a history that we somehow distinguish from American History. At the very least, I want you, the readers to know that this dilemma existed. And so, this Digest will not be curated in honor of Black History Month, but I will, here and now, make a commitment to maintaining diversity in all of my Digest posts – of authors and of topics.

So here are the greatest things brought to you by the internet in the last seven days: Continue reading

Footprints, Families, and Fallacies

[Savage Minds welcomes guest blogger, Jane Eva Baxter]

Yesterday, the media widely reported the discovery of 850,000 (or so) year old footprints at the British seaside village of Happisburgh. This media coverage coincided with the publication of an article in the open access, peer reviewed journal PLoS ONE, and the announcement that the footprints will be featured as part of an upcoming exhibition called, “Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story” at the Natural History Museum in London.  While the AP story can be found through your media outlet of choice, you also can read a bit about the find through the British Museum blog by curator Nicholas Ashton, who was involved with the project.

The Allure of Footprints

This discovery has generated a good deal of enthusiasm among the general public.  As some small measure of this excitement, I can report six students in my World Prehistory course (of 40 students) emailed me with links to news coverage about the find in a single day. This is not typical, and such news sharing is not required or even necessarily encouraged as part of the course. Archaeologist Clive Gamble, quoted in the AP article, explains why this discovery has such a popular appeal. “This is the closest we’ve got to seeing the people,” he told the AP. “When I heard about it, it was like hearing the first line of [William Blake's hymn] ‘Jerusalem’ — ‘And did those feet, in ancient time, walk upon England’s mountains green?’ Well, they walked upon its muddy estuary.” Continue reading

Around the Web Digest

Having survived the Arctic Vortex (twice) and any number of ridiculously named storms my Southerner’s imagination is already trained to warmer weather. So while I’m composing this blog post to wind and rain, in my brain its already Easter and we’re eating fajitas and drinking beer in the sun. The Spring may seem like wishful thinking considering all the work that needs to be done between now and then. The deadlines flutter about and the crush of midterms is just around the corner. If you can, take the time out of your busy day to share with me the interesting links you find in your Internet travels, email me at mdthomps@odu.edu. I’d be happy to put them out over Twitter via @savageminds. The Facebook page has all the same links and you can leave comments too.

About once a month I collect the links we shared in a digest. Check it out. Maybe you’ll find one you missed.

On taking ontological turns

I didn’t make it to the AAA 2013 meetings.  I heard the news though: ontology is the next big thing.  I’m not sure what to make of this.  I am all for getting your theory on, but so far I haven’t heard anything from this latest ontological craze that’s really hit home.  Maybe I’m not paying enough attention.  Maybe I’m not reading the right stuff.  Or, perhaps after several years of being subjected to high doses of academic theory-talk, I have overdosed and now have some sort of weird allergy to anything that remotely resembles jargon.  In that case I just need some Benadryl and everything should be in order shortly.

I did read a post over on Allegra by Isaac Morrison about this whole “ontological turn” thing that makes some good points.  Here’s how it starts: Continue reading

Stoller and the 2014 challenge for social science

Paul Stoller has a new piece on HuffPo about saving the social sciences (and liberal arts).  Here’s a good snippet:

The challenge for the social sciences — at least for me — is to simultaneously maintain rigorous standards while producing works that clearly and powerfully articulate important insights to broad audiences across a variety of media. In my discipline, anthropology, the challenge is to communicate critical insights about social life in such a way that moves audiences to think and to act.

Many of my colleagues devote considerable energy to debate the whys and wherefores of nature, culture, social change, globalization and ontological turns. These debates are usually articulated in specialized languages that may demonstrate brilliance but often limit the reach of insight. There is no reason that theoretically informed findings cannot be communicated to broad audiences.

See that last line?  He’s right.  Read the rest here and then go write something that would make Stoller proud.

Around the Web Digest

As we slip into the spring semester (tomorrow is my first day in the classroom) and return to pace of life on campus — commuting, parking, shaving on a regular basis — we’re all no doubt looking for that most invaluable resource… some links to click on during coffee breaks. Well fear not gentle reader! Around the Web Digest is here to collect for you all the links you might have missed from our Twitter feed @savageminds. If you’re not the tweetin’ type you can get the same stuff by liking our Facebook page. And please feel free to send me resources, current events, and blog posts you would like to share with the Savage Minds community by emailing me at mdthomps@odu.edu.

Now without further ado, the links!

  • RT @anthroprez: @savageminds @Liebow4 sending letter and AAA statement on HTS
  • Mandela inspired generations. Help him inspire the next generation — Teach him in your next class. -Rx

Around the Web Digest

Welcome back AAA conference-goers, while you sleep off your hangovers/ jet-lag use your ample free time to catch up on all the links you missed. Please follow us @savageminds or like or Facebook page to get anthropology themed news, blogs, and other interesting Internet flotsam on a semi-daily basis. Twitter users will want to check the second to last bullet point, Kerim has shared his growing list of anthropologists on Twitter. If you’ve spied something around the web that you’d like to share with the Savage Minds community email me at mdthomps@odu.edu. Happy clicking!

October

Around the Web Digest

The kids have this thing called Twitter and since most of us Savages are courting a mid-life crisis we decided it would be a good idea to get hip and shout the academic equivalent of “Get off my lawn” from our respective ivory towers. Now if only we could afford convertibles everything would be all right! Follow us @savageminds or like our Facebook page, which pretty much has the same thing. If you’re actively avoiding the timesuck of social networks, you’re in luck because ever month or two I collect all the tweets here on the blog. If you’ve seen something around the web that you’d like to share with the Savage Minds community, email me at [mdthomps@odu.edu] or tweet back at us. So, without further ado here’s a selection of what we were reading in August and September.

August

OAC Online Seminar: A cultural analysis of the Lance Armstrong "reality show"

The Open Anthropology Cooperative (OAC) is continuing its online seminar series with its latest installment (#17), a paper by Lee Drummond that takes on the Lance Armstrong phenomena (or debacle), using it as a lens for understanding American society.   The seminar is well underway, and will be open for comments and questions until September 21.  Here’s a bit from Drummond’s abstract: Continue reading

Around the Web Digest

Every day at Savage Minds we are diligently scouring the web for the best and most relevant current events and anthropology blogs. Ha! No not really. We just throw some stuff up on Twitter every once in awhile. But some of it is actually pretty good. At the first of the month I re-post our tweets here on the blog, just in case you missed one.

If you like your links a little more fresh, I invite you to follow us @savageminds or like our Facebook page. And if you’ve seen something around the web that you’d like to share with our community you can reach me at [mdthomps@odu.edu].