Category Archives: Around the Web

Around the Web Digest: Week of April 27

Ladies. Gentlemen. I’ll be your host today, as we navigate some of last week’s most interesting pieces that the internet has to offer – to anthropologists anyway. Today, our selection is about 50% larger than usual. I can’t offer one article that stands above the rest, but like last week, there is a small selection: Pay special attention to the works of Janelle Taylor, Todd Meyers, and Adrienne Strong.

If you’ll allow me a moment of a reflexivity: I’m starting to notice a trend in my own posts – race, gender, reproduction – and I thought that perhaps I should move away from those topics as a way to provide a better, well-rounded digest…and then I decided that if you wanted something different, you’d tell me or find another digest – of which there are many. (And yet, there is no metadigest. Someone should get on that.) Anyway, if you have a blog post or news item that you think I should mention in my digest, please let me know by email (richard.powis@gmail.com) or via Twitter @dtpowis.

After you. Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of April 20

Hello folks. Here’s the news that you might have missed this week, if your 4/20 was as crazy as mine (which is to say, crazy with grocery shopping, house tidying, box packing, and the like. Oh drugs? No. I don’t have time for that.) Lots of news this week, but not a whole lot from the anthro-blogosphere. (We are a couple weeks from the end of the semester, so I imagine people are preoccupied for the moment.) If you have any news or blogs that you want to share with me, please, shoot me an email at richard.powis@gmail.com or hit up on Twitter @dtpowis.

Alright, let’s do this. Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of April 13

Happy Sunday, folks! Here’s a roundup of what you might have missed last week. If you read only one thing, check out Sarah Kendzior’s article on minimum wage workers in St. Louis. I also highly recommend the BORDERLAND website that NPR has put together. As usual, if you have any news or blogs that you want me to share, please send me an email at richard.powis@gmail.com or hit up on Twitter @dtpowis.

Onward! Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of April 6

A day late and a dollar short. I had some trouble getting home from the Central States Anthropological Society meeting in Normal, IL, but I made it! These links still cover the week of April 6th, so nothing has changed there, but this list is shorter than normal. So anyway, if you have any suggestions for articles or blogs, please don’t hesitate to email me at richard.powis@gmail.com or find me on Twitter @dtpowis.

Distract yourself from grading or writing up a final paper; here’s what you (and I) missed last week. Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of May 30

This week was a blast, especially April Fool’s Day. Hopefully, you didn’t miss our very own Twainian satire, “Counterpoint: Good Americans should pay their debts, thank Sallie Mae,” or the Buzzfeedian listicle, “11 Cutting-Edge Thinkers That Anthropologists Should Be Paying Attention to Right Now!” Thank you all for sharing the latter – it was great fun to put together. If you sent me an angry email that was quickly followed up by an apology, or an angry tweet that was quickly deleted, don’t worry – you weren’t the only one. As usual, if you have any links or blogs that you want me to share, send them my way at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter @dtpowis.

Here’s what you missed this week: Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of March 23

You guys. There were so many good articles this week. Excellent, excellent articles. I was pretty overwhelmed, to be honest, especially when I was trying to select the one article that I wanted to highlight this week. I can’t put them all up, but I think I’ve picked some of the best (or at least thought-provoking). As always, if you have any links that you want to share, please send them my way at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter @dtpowis.

To the Digest! Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of March 16

Student protests in Taiwan, International Day of Happiness, and the Society for Applied Anthropology meeting in Albuquerque – it’s been a busy week. If you went to SfAA this week, and you have a blog or some sort of coverage that you’d like to share with us, please let me know – as with anything you might want to see in the Digest – by email (richard.powis@gmail.com) or on Twitter @dtpowis. Anyway, as I said last week, there is one article that I’d like to highlight for those that might be short on time. Now, it might just be the goth kid in me that I’ve been trying to suppress since just after high school, but I really enjoyed Miia Halme-Tuomisaari’s critique of happiness (or, at least measures of happiness). Check it out below. Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of March 9

There have been very many language/linguistics-related items this week, so the first several links will be related. Also, this week I’ve decided that I’m going to start drawing your attention to one particular article in the Digest. This is to say, if you read just one article here, I highly recommend “this one.” As always, if you have any blog articles or suggestions, send them my way at richard.powis@gmail.com and be sure to follow me on Twitter @dtpowis. Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of March 2

A couple weeks ago, when I took helm of the HMS Around the Web Digest (yeah, it’s British – it’s my ship and I do what I want), I was naïve enough to think that I would curate collections of themed articles. Alas, there is just so much good stuff that it’s really difficult at the end of the week to select the things that I don’t want to share. I do my best to cut the chaff (yeah, I just went from running a ship to processing wheat), so I apologize if it’s overwhelming. I am open to feedback! Anyway, if you have a blog article that you would like to be shared in the Around the Web Digest, just hit me at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter @dtpowis. So here we go. Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of February 23

In the face of highly productive biological anthropologists, as well as the blog Somatosphere, I think I managed to curate a pretty well-rounded Around the Web Digest for this week. If you have a blog post or article that you would like mentioned next week, shoot it to me at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter. Of course, if this were any other blog, my first link would say, “Hey, go check out Savage Minds’ new design!” but alas, you’re already here. What I bet you didn’t know is: The whole site is back up, archives and all. I mean, look at this gem that I found from 2005! (Gawd, I wasn’t even a twinkle in my advisor’s eye.) Continue reading

Around the Web Digest: Week of February 16

Greetings all! My name is Dick Powis and I’m one of the new interns here at Savage Minds. You may know me from my own blog, Anthropology Attacks!, where I yammer on and few listen. As an intern, I will be taking over the Around the Web Digests from Matt Thompson. I intend to post new Digests weekly, starting today, and as you’ll see, I’m going to be doing it a little differently. If you come across any stories or articles that you think I should mention in next week’s Digest, please email me at richard.powis@gmail.com. I’m also looking forward to connecting with other anthropology bloggers who would like to have their works promoted, so please follow me @dtpowis on Twitter.

So I’d like to start off my first Around the Web Digest with my dilemma. Should I curate a collection of links in honor of Black History Month? On the one hand, I think that featuring a collection of articles related to Black History/Anthropology would be a great gesture on behalf of the kind of diversity that we want to see in anthropology. On the other hand, my opinion of Black History Month is not unlike that voiced by many of my colleagues in the humanities: it is a hollow attempt at equity, the designation of the shortest month of the year in honor of a history that we somehow distinguish from American History. At the very least, I want you, the readers to know that this dilemma existed. And so, this Digest will not be curated in honor of Black History Month, but I will, here and now, make a commitment to maintaining diversity in all of my Digest posts – of authors and of topics.

So here are the greatest things brought to you by the internet in the last seven days: Continue reading

Footprints, Families, and Fallacies

[Savage Minds welcomes guest blogger, Jane Eva Baxter]

Yesterday, the media widely reported the discovery of 850,000 (or so) year old footprints at the British seaside village of Happisburgh. This media coverage coincided with the publication of an article in the open access, peer reviewed journal PLoS ONE, and the announcement that the footprints will be featured as part of an upcoming exhibition called, “Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story” at the Natural History Museum in London.  While the AP story can be found through your media outlet of choice, you also can read a bit about the find through the British Museum blog by curator Nicholas Ashton, who was involved with the project.

The Allure of Footprints

This discovery has generated a good deal of enthusiasm among the general public.  As some small measure of this excitement, I can report six students in my World Prehistory course (of 40 students) emailed me with links to news coverage about the find in a single day. This is not typical, and such news sharing is not required or even necessarily encouraged as part of the course. Archaeologist Clive Gamble, quoted in the AP article, explains why this discovery has such a popular appeal. “This is the closest we’ve got to seeing the people,” he told the AP. “When I heard about it, it was like hearing the first line of [William Blake's hymn] ‘Jerusalem’ — ‘And did those feet, in ancient time, walk upon England’s mountains green?’ Well, they walked upon its muddy estuary.” Continue reading

Around the Web Digest

Having survived the Arctic Vortex (twice) and any number of ridiculously named storms my Southerner’s imagination is already trained to warmer weather. So while I’m composing this blog post to wind and rain, in my brain its already Easter and we’re eating fajitas and drinking beer in the sun. The Spring may seem like wishful thinking considering all the work that needs to be done between now and then. The deadlines flutter about and the crush of midterms is just around the corner. If you can, take the time out of your busy day to share with me the interesting links you find in your Internet travels, email me at mdthomps@odu.edu. I’d be happy to put them out over Twitter via @savageminds. The Facebook page has all the same links and you can leave comments too.

About once a month I collect the links we shared in a digest. Check it out. Maybe you’ll find one you missed.

On taking ontological turns

I didn’t make it to the AAA 2013 meetings.  I heard the news though: ontology is the next big thing.  I’m not sure what to make of this.  I am all for getting your theory on, but so far I haven’t heard anything from this latest ontological craze that’s really hit home.  Maybe I’m not paying enough attention.  Maybe I’m not reading the right stuff.  Or, perhaps after several years of being subjected to high doses of academic theory-talk, I have overdosed and now have some sort of weird allergy to anything that remotely resembles jargon.  In that case I just need some Benadryl and everything should be in order shortly.

I did read a post over on Allegra by Isaac Morrison about this whole “ontological turn” thing that makes some good points.  Here’s how it starts: Continue reading