Comments on: What do we know about struggle? http://savageminds.org/2013/02/09/what-do-we-know-about-struggle/ Notes and Queries in Anthropology Thu, 27 Aug 2015 17:11:51 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 By: From concern to counterforce | Savage Minds http://savageminds.org/2013/02/09/what-do-we-know-about-struggle/comment-page-1/#comment-802507 Tue, 26 Feb 2013 14:35:03 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=9301#comment-802507 […] the unions’ roles were concerned. But beyond that, many of the library staff had become part of a group of employees who, over the past year of combining pressure with negotiations, had been drawing links […]

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By: Your input here | Savage Minds http://savageminds.org/2013/02/09/what-do-we-know-about-struggle/comment-page-1/#comment-798393 Thu, 21 Feb 2013 02:14:25 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=9301#comment-798393 […] brings me back to the questions I posed here earlier this month: what knowledge have we each gained from our own struggles for the future of our […]

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By: Anthropology Blog Update and Book Feature: Local Lives | Anthropology Report http://savageminds.org/2013/02/09/what-do-we-know-about-struggle/comment-page-1/#comment-793916 Mon, 11 Feb 2013 17:04:04 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=9301#comment-793916 […] What do we know about struggle?, Donya Alinejad I’ve been inspired and invigorated by the piercing critiques in columns/forums/books/articles that anthropologist and others have recently taken to in order to think through the worrying ways in which neoliberal ideas are shaping our academic institutions. More than anything, pieces by young anthropologists and other scholars far away made clear to me just how close the parallels are between the basic processes underway at our respective universities internationally (i.e. increasingly precarious labor positions with short-term contracts, divestment and cuts, increasing workloads and class-sizes, individuation and commoditization of education, management goals trumping scientific content, divorcing science from its role as public good unless commercially valuable, undermining smaller and qualitative programs, etc. not to mention the issues around for-profit publishing). Yet what I’ve been missing are people’s stories about what they’re doing with these critiques at their respective institutions. I have little to no idea how you are all making changes (or stopping changes) in your workplaces, and, more importantly, how your experiences with the practices of struggle might valuably feed back into your critical analyses about the nature of the problems we face. So, without speaking for the many others involved in our initiative, here’s something that some humble, new practices of struggle helped me find out. […]

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By: Anthropology Blog Update and Book Feature: Local Lives | Anthropology Report http://savageminds.org/2013/02/09/what-do-we-know-about-struggle/comment-page-1/#comment-793915 Mon, 11 Feb 2013 17:04:04 +0000 http://savageminds.org/?p=9301#comment-793915 […] What do we know about struggle?, Donya Alinejad I’ve been inspired and invigorated by the piercing critiques in columns/forums/books/articles that anthropologist and others have recently taken to in order to think through the worrying ways in which neoliberal ideas are shaping our academic institutions. More than anything, pieces by young anthropologists and other scholars far away made clear to me just how close the parallels are between the basic processes underway at our respective universities internationally (i.e. increasingly precarious labor positions with short-term contracts, divestment and cuts, increasing workloads and class-sizes, individuation and commoditization of education, management goals trumping scientific content, divorcing science from its role as public good unless commercially valuable, undermining smaller and qualitative programs, etc. not to mention the issues around for-profit publishing). Yet what I’ve been missing are people’s stories about what they’re doing with these critiques at their respective institutions. I have little to no idea how you are all making changes (or stopping changes) in your workplaces, and, more importantly, how your experiences with the practices of struggle might valuably feed back into your critical analyses about the nature of the problems we face. So, without speaking for the many others involved in our initiative, here’s something that some humble, new practices of struggle helped me find out. […]

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