1010010101011001

Translation: Digital Anthropology Group officially exists now.

In March and April there was great enthusiasm around organizing an interest group focused on digital topics and methods and about 75 people graciously shared their email address with me to help make it happen. I’m happy to announce that DANG officially exists and we’re having our first business meeting in San Francisco on Friday, November 16 at 12:15pm. Since not everyone can be there and we want to be an intentionally inclusive community of anthropologists I would like to see our group harness Twitter and Google hang-outs to bring people from around the world into full participation during the business meeting. I’ll be master of ceremonies and I look forward to meeting you there.

As I see it the questions before us now center on what our Digital Anthropology Group can become. What do you want to see on the agenda at the DANG business meeting? And what do you visualize your Digital Anthropology Group to be in the future?

I’ve created some venues where we can continue the conversation and introduce new topics. Please visit our DANG blog at https://01anthropology.wordpress.com/ and leave comments! If anyone wants to write for the blog, please come forward. We are especially interested to hear about anthropologists conducting research on digital topics, using Internet platforms in the classroom, implementing digital communication tools in applied practice, and reflecting on the usefulness of blogging for professional development.

Follow us @01anthropology and we will follow you. I’d like to get as much input as possible from what DANG members see as the mission of this group, and Twitter can be a great companion to our blog when it comes to accomplishing that. Let’s continue to think big and be ambitious. Brainstorm and share your ideas with me.

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Matt Thompson is adjunct assistant professor of anthropology in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice at Old Dominion University and a Masters student in the School of Information Science at the University of Tennessee. He was once cast as a soldier in Andrew Jackson's army in a theatrical production on an Indian reservation.

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